Events

City-wide Stations of the Cross: Good Friday, March 29, 2013

chagall, the exodusOn Good Friday, March 29th, you are invited to join faith leaders, homeless advocates, and other community members as we journey across downtown Nashville on foot to observe and participate in the Stations of the Cross. The Stations of the Cross originated as a way to help Jesus’ followers retrace his steps to the cross. They often take the form of a spiritual pilgrimage through his suffering and crucifixion, enabling participants to contemplate and enter into the mystery of Jesus’ gift of himself to us.

Likewise, we’ll journey through our city on a spiritual and physical pilgrimage to contemplate what the stations mean for us today and for the marginalized, impoverished, homeless, and condemned in our community. We’ll visit symbolic places where Jesus and the poor continue to be betrayed, condemned, helped, consoled, and crucified like the jail, State Capitol, Legislative Plaza, Courthouse, and downtown churches. We’ll meet at the park on Church Street directly in front of the Downtown Public Library (615 Church St.) at 4:00 p.m. You can park at the library (make sure to have your ticket validated).

You’ll need to wear shoes comfortable for walking and everyone is encouraged to wear black as a sign of mourning. We plan to conclude around7:30 p.m. If you have questions or would like more information, please e-mail us at nashvillehomelessorganizing@gmail.com. Here is the Facebook page for this event. 

Rally for the Right to Exist: April 1st, 2012 (Palm Sunday)

Join us for worship, a rally, and a sleep-in to protest the criminalization of homelessness. Just as Jesus entered the gates of Jerusalem, wept over the city, and embraced the suffering therein, we also enter our city, weep over the injustice we see, and embrace the suffering, seeking to transform it.

Nashville homeless advocates will host a “Rally for the Right to Exist”with food, teach-ins, documentaries, music, and discussions culminating with a mass “sleep-in” to stand (and sleep) in solidarity with our unhoused neighbors and to support the civil and human rights of all, particularly the poor and homeless. This rally and act of civil disobedience is intended to draw attention to Metro Nashville and the State of Tennessee’s onerous anti-homeless laws. The event is part of a larger bi-national day of action with more than a dozen other cities across the United States and Canada participating to raise awareness about the ongoing criminalization of homelessness in our communities.  

Where: Legislative Plaza, 301 6th Ave. North, Nashville, TN 37243. (In case of rain, check our Facebook page for this event.)

When: Sunday April 1st from 1:30pm until Monday April 2nd at 7:00am. (Come whenever you can!)

Schedule of Events:
1:30 p.m… Free lunch with Food Not Bombs
3:00-4:00… Meditation, talking circles, and Palm Sunday worship with Amos House
4:00-5:00… Mobile foot clinic
5:00-6:00… Pot-luck dinner with music (bring food if you can!)
6:00-6:30… Welcome and introductions
6:30-7:30… Teach-ins including “Know Your Rights” and “Criminalization in Nashville”
7:30-9:30… Screening of a documentary
9:30-Sunrise… Sleep-in on the Plaza

Celebration of Labor: September 5th, 2011

This year, Amos House is co-sponsoring a “Celebration of Labor” with Vanderbilt Divinity School’s Economic Empowerment Coalition (EEC) and a number of other organizations. This Labor Day celebration will be held on Monday, September 5th from 3-7 pm at the Vanderbilt Divinity School Courtyard/Reading Room (across the street from SATCO and Ben & Jerry’s on 21st Ave.).

Come meet workers, organizers, students, clergy, and community members at this second annual event to celebrate the work of our fellow Nashvillians with a picnic dinner, poetry, and music. If you can’t come for the whole time, feel free to drop in whenever you can. Join us as we build a vibrant faith-labor movement in Nashville!

Citywide Stations of the Cross: Good Friday, April 22nd, 2011

On Good Friday, April 22nd, you are invited to join us as we journey across downtown Nashville on foot to observe and participate in the Stations of the Cross.

The Stations of the Cross originated as a way to help Jesus’ followers retrace his steps to the cross. They often take the form of a spiritual pilgrimage through his suffering and crucifixion, enabling participants to contemplate and enter into the mystery of Jesus’ gift of himself to us.

Likewise, we’ll journey through our city on a spiritual and physical pilgrimage to contemplate what the stations mean for us today and for the marginalized, impoverished, and homeless in our community. We’ll visit symbolic places where Jesus and the poor are betrayed, condemned, helped, consoled, and crucified like the courthouse, the jail, the state capitol, and downtown churches. We’ll meet at the park on Church Street directly in front of the Downtown Public Library at 4:00 P.M. You can park at the library (and make sure to have your ticket validated).

You’ll need to wear shoes comfortable for walking and everyone is encouraged to wear black as a sign of mourning. (And if it rains, just bring an umbrella!) We plan to conclude between 7:00-7:30 P.M. If you have questions or would like more information, please e-mail us at amoshousemercyfund@gmail.com.

Holy Week on the Streets – March 31st to April 4th, 2010

During the week leading up to Easter, traditionally known as “Holy Week,” you’re invited to join Amos House Community as we engage in an exercise of spiritual awakening and understanding on the streets of Nashville. Just as Jesus intentionally turned toward Jerusalem and embraced the conflict and suffering that would lead to his crucifixion, we will turn toward the City and embrace the conflict and suffering that the poor and homeless are met with on a daily basis, a conflict and suffering that often leads to the crucifixion of the Poorest of the Poor.

Every day, a different group of up to 10 people, co-led by housed and unhoused disciples of Jesus, will spend 24 hours on foot walking the streets of Nashville, reading scripture, praying, breaking bread, and journeying to important places in the lives of our brothers and sisters on the streets.

Holy Week is not an urban plunge; rather, it is a spiritual pilgrimage of sorts, intended to be an interactive and conversational time of listening, learning, and reverence. In the spirit of Lenten fasting, those participating will not be allowed to bring money, food, cell phones, extra clothing, or other supplies with them. Participants can, however, bring identification, a water bottle, journal, and Bible. Each group will depend on the hospitality of others and will decide how to get around town, what and where to eat, where to sleep, and where to use the bathroom.

For additional information or questions, please contact us at amoshousemercyfund@gmail.com. Spots for each 24 hour period are filling up quickly so please contact us soon and let us know which day you would like to commit to as follows:

Thursday, April 1st at 4:30pm- Friday at 4:30pm (Group Leader: Jeannie Alexander)*NOW FULL

Friday, April 2nd at 4:00pm- Saturday at 4:30pm (Group Leaders: Lindsey and Andrew Krinks)*NOW FULL

Saturday, April 3rd at 4:30pm- Sunday at 4:30pm (Group Leader: Matt Preston)*NOW FULL

We ask that you commit to an entire 24 hour period of time, even if that means taking a day off work or from school. After you sign up, we will send a follow-up e-mail with more details (where to meet each day, etc.). Friday will also be the City-wide Stations of the Cross event, which the Friday group will participate in.

City-wide Stations of the Cross – Good Friday, April 2nd at 4:00pm

On Good Friday, April 2nd, you are invited to join Amos House Community as we journey across downtown Nashville on foot to observe and participate in the Stations of the Cross.

The Stations of the Cross originated as a way to help Jesus’ followers retrace his steps to the cross. They often take the form of a spiritual pilgrimage through his suffering and crucifixion, enabling participants to contemplate and enter into the mystery of Jesus’ gift of himself to us.

Likewise, we’ll journey through our city on a spiritual and physical pilgrimage to contemplate what the stations mean for us today and for the marginalized, impoverished, and homeless in our community. We’ll visit symbolic places where Jesus and the poor are betrayed, condemned, helped, consoled, and crucified like the Courthouse, Downtown Presbyterian Church, the jail, and the State Capitol. We’ll meet at the park on Church Street directly in front of the Downtown Public Library at 4:00 P.M. and begin our journey at 4:30.

You are welcome to come and go throughout the evening as you can. If you come late and would like to meet up with us, call us at (615) 497-0447 and someone will be available to connect you with the group.

You’ll need to wear shoes comfortable for walking and bring a water bottle. If you have questions or would like more information, please e-mail us.

Interdependence Day – July 4th, 2009

On July 4th, join Amos House and our sister communities (Sharpe Avenue Community House and members of the Nashville Greenlands Catholic Worker House) as we re-imagine our citizenship and celebrate Interdependence Day. We’ll meet at the park on Church St. across from the Downtown Public Library at 3:30 P.M. to celebrate our interdependence on one another and ultimately God by washing the feet of each other and our homeless brothers and sisters. We’ll then head to the Sharpe Avenue Community House in East Nashville* for a spaghetti dinner, music, readings from Wendell Berry and other subversive prophets (including Jesus), and possibly have some dancing and/or singing of hymns. If you want to come for dinner, bring a buck or two to contribute if you can. We also welcome side dishes and desserts. We hope to see you there! If you’d like more information or have any questions, please e-mail us at amoshousemercyfund@gmail.com.

If you’d like to see how other people are celebrating Interdependence Day, click here.  *1022 Sharpe Ave. Nashville, TN 37206

Holy Week on the Streets – April 6th-12th, 2009

Throughout the week leading up to Easter, traditionally known as “Holy Week,” Amos House and friends set out to meet Jesus on the streets. Every day during the week, a different group of about 8 people spent 24 hour periods on the streets reading scripture, praying, breaking bread, and journeying to symbolic places important in the lives of the poor and homeless in our city.

Just as Jesus intentionally turned toward Jerusalem and embraced the suffering that would lead to his crucifixion, we intentionally turned toward our city and embraced the suffering that the poor and homeless are met with on a daily basis that often leads to their death/crucifixion.

Holy Week was an interactive and conversational time of learning and reverence. Those participating were not allowed to take any money, food, supplies, or extra clothing. They brought a water bottle, bible, and journal with them and the team leader(s) were the only one(s) with cell phones. Each team walked on foot around town, depended on the hospitality of strangers for their food, and they slept wherever they could find a place: a local homeless encampment, a bridge, the porch of a church, etc. We will most definitely lead this again next year and are grateful to our friends who live on the streets for their generosity, kindness, and their willingness to share their experiences and lives with us.

City Wide Stations of the Cross – April 10th, 2009 

The Stations of the Cross originated as a way to help Jesus’ followers retrace his steps to the cross. They often take the form of a spiritual pilgrimage through his suffering and crucifixion, enabling participants to contemplate and enter into the mystery of Jesus’ gift of himself to us.

On April 10th, or “Good Friday,” Amos House hosted a City Wide Stations of the Cross where Christians of different ages and denominations came together to walk through downtown Nashville to read and contemplate scripture and pray for the oppressed in our community.

We journeyed through our city on a spiritual and physical pilgrimage to discover what the stations mean for us today and for the marginalized, impoverished, and homeless in our community. We visited symbolic places where Jesus and the poor are betrayed, condemned, helped, consoled, and crucified like the Courthouse, the Jail, Downtown Presbyterian Church, and the State Capitol.

This experience was incredibly powerful and we are planning on doing it again next year.

To see more pictures from the event, visit http://justinwrightphoto.zenfolio.com/p74090417